1. Los Fralibos - A song by and for the workers of Fralib

    The workers of Fralib sing about their struggle.

    "Thé de l'Eléphant was born in Provence, it must stay in Provence"

    The workers of Fralib (the Elephant Tea) in Géménos spent 1336 days of struggle against Unilever, the giant multinational behind the Lipton brand. Their collective strength finally managed to make the multinational cave in, and thus SCOPTI coop was born. Their struggle is recounted here by the workers themselves, in French, to the rhythm of the Los Fralibos protest song. 

  2. Social Waste - "At utopia's fiesta"

    A video clip by Greek militant hip-hop collective Social Waste, filmed at the recuperated factory of VIOME.

    Captions available in English, Spanish, Italian, Greek. read more »

  3. Occupy, Resist, Produce – Officine Zero

    The second in a series of short documentaries on the recuperated factories of Europe.

    Officine Zero, former RSI (Rail Service Italia) was dedicated to the maintenance and repair of sleeping cars. When in December 2011 Italian train services decided to stop the night train service and invest in fast track trains, RSI closed. Some 20 workers out of the almost 60 employees strong work force did not accept the closing and took up the struggle. They found support among the activists from the nearby social center, “Strike.” In February 2012 they occupied their work place. Together they started a laboratory on reconversion, organizing public assemblies attended by hundreds of people. read more »

  4. Occupy, Resist, Produce – VIOME

    The third in a series of short documentaries on the recuperated factories of Europe.

    VIOME is a building materials factory in Thessaloniki, Greece, which was abandoned by its owners at the peak of the Greek crisis, in 2011. Subsequently it was occupied by its workers, and has been producing natural detergents under workers' control since 2013. Despite being an emblematic and inspiring struggle, today VIOME is under imminent threat of eviction. read more »

  5. How Workers Laid Off from a Chicago Factory Took It Over Themselves

    When their boss tried to fire them, the workers of Republic Windows and Doors occupied the factory. Now they own it as a cooperative.

    Four years ago, as the recession took hold and layoffs around the country were approaching 500,000 a month, a group of workers in Chicago saved a factory and inspired a nation. Fired by their boss, they occupied instead of leaving. Fired by a second boss, they occupied and formed a worker’s cooperative. Now they are worker-owners of a load of equipment and they’re setting up a factory in a new location. read more »

  6. Proletarian Power: The Turin Factory Councils 1919-1920

    The Bienno Rosso, the two red years which threatened to overthrow Italian capitalism, represents one of the high points of working class struggle in the history of the world labor movement.

    The Turin Factory Council movement which emerged at the height of the Bienno Rosso, the two red years which threatened to overthrow Italian capitalism, represents one of the high points of working class struggle in the history of the world labor movement. read more »

  7. When the Workers Become the Owners: Taking the Co-op Movement to the Next Level

    An interview with Esteban Kelly and Melissa Hoover, two prominent figures in the worker-cooperative movement.

    There's a revolution taking place in the US workforce - but you may not have heard about it.

    Around the country, workers are starting businesses that they democratically control and that financially benefit them. These businesses, called worker cooperatives, are owned and governed by the employees. Every worker is a member of the co-op, which gives them one share and one vote in the company's operations. read more »

  8. A Deeper Look at the Mondragon Principles 3: The Instrumental and Subordinate Nature of Capital

    Worker Co-ops and their Requirements for Capital within Limits

    “We do not aspire to economic development as an end, but as a means.”

    –Don José María Arizmendiarrieta, spiritual founder of Mondragon read more »

  9. A Deeper Look at the Mondragon Principles 1: Sovereignty of Labor

    Overcoming the Rift Between Worker Coops and the Labor Left

    The Mondragon principle “Sovereignty of Labor” created departure from the cooperative movement. While the Rochdale Pioneers had good intentions, they abandoned worker cooperation in the 1870’s. The Fabian Socialist moved even further from the ideals of Robert Owen declaring consumerism as the lowest common denominator for human relationships eschewing workers as merely another stakeholder group. Even the French cooperativist Charles Gide turned away from worker associations. read more »

  10. A Deeper Look at the Mondragon Principles 2: Participatory Management

    Needed: Self-Management and Workplace Democracy

    The next principle from Mondragon is that of Participatory Management. This seems like a no-brainer for worker co-operatives. What is the point of going through all the work of setting up a worker co-op if the workers don’t actually have a say in how the place is run? They would be better off in a unionized Employee Stock Ownership Program. read more »

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